These are some of the questions we've heard related to data modeling and relationships in Tableau. If you have a question that isn't in this list, please share it with us by clicking the blue Send feedback icon in the bottom right corner of this Help page, (click Yes or No, add your question in the Comment field, and then click Send).

Relationships

Is a relationship just a different name for a join?

Relationships are a dynamic, flexible way to combine data from multiple tables for analysis. A relationship describes how two independent, logical tables relate to each other, but does not merge the tables together. When a relationship is created between tables, the tables remain separate (normalized), maintaining their native level of detail and domains. You can use relationships to create multi-fact data models.

When you open a pre-2020.2 workbook or data source in a 2020.2 version of Tableau, your data source will appear as a single logical table in the canvas with the name 'Migrated Data'. You can rename the Migrated Data table. Your original, denormalized data may have been originally built from one or more tables using joins and unions. Tip: While Tableau Desktop has the capability to create joins and do some basic data shaping, Tableau Prep Builder is designed for data preparation. If you need to do multiple joins, clean up field names, change data types, perform multiple pivots, or other sorts of involved data prep, consider using Tableau Prep Builder (Link opens in a new. When you open a pre-2020.2 workbook or data source in a 2020.2 version of Tableau, your data source will appear as a single logical table in the canvas. You can continue to use the workbook as you did before. If your data source contained multiple joined or unioned tables, the single logical table is displayed with the name 'Migrated Data'. In Tableau 2020.1, Tableau will automatically update the parameter’s list of values and a workbook is opened. This is one of the most requested features of all time! Tableau Prep Builder – Lots of Enhancements.

You can’t set a join type for relationships. Relationships defer joins to the time and context of analysis. Tableau automatically selects what join types should be used based on the current fields in use in the viz. During analysis, Tableau adjusts join types intelligently and preserves the native level of detail in your data. You can see aggregations at the level of detail of the fields in your viz rather than having to think about the underlying joins.

Relationships can be many-to-many and support full outer joins. You don't need to use LOD expressions such as FIXED to deduplicate data in related tables.

Learn more: For related information on combining data using relationships, also see these topics and blog posts:

Can I use joins between logical tables?

You must use relationships between logical tables. You can only use joins between physical tables contained in a logical table. Double-click a logical table to open it.

We recommend using relationships as your first approach to combining your data because it makes your data preparation and analysis easier and more intuitive. Use joins only when you absolutely need to. Situations where you might still use joins include when you want to:

  • Continue to use a data source from a pre-2020.2 version to Tableau that you have upgraded to 2020.2
  • Explicitly use a specific join type
  • Use a data model that supports shared dimensions

Where did joins go? Can I still combine table data using joins?

Joins are still an option for combining your data. You just need to open a logical table to work with joins (double-click a logical table to open it). Tables that you join get merged into a single logical table.

Are relationships like blends? When should I use a blend?

While both relationships and blends support analysis at different levels of detail, they have distinct differences. If you want to combine data from published data sources, blends are currently your only option.

You might also choose to use blends when the fields used to join two tables are dependent on the worksheet.

Blends only support left joins, while relationships support full outer joins. Blends can be customized on a per-sheet basis.

Data sources, data model, and connections

Tableau Desktop 2020.4

How have data sources changed?

In versions before 2020.2, tables that you combined in the Data Source page using joins and unions made up the data model in a data source. The data was merged into a single, flat table.

In Tableau 2020.2, a new logical layer has been added to Tableau's data model. The logical layer and relationships expand your options for bringing the data you need into Tableau. You can now create normalized data sources with multiple tables at different levels of detail. Related tables aren't merged; they remain distinct. Using relationships makes creating and analyzing data across multiple tables more flexible and more intuitive.

You can still create single-table data sources in Tableau. You can build a logical table using a combination of joins, unions, custom SQL, and so on. The behavior of single-table analysis in Tableau has not changed. Analysis over a single logical table that contains a mixture of dimensions and measures works just as in Tableau pre-2020.2. When you upgrade a workbook or data source to 2020.2, will contain a single logical table that represents your pre-2020.2 data source. It will work the same as it did before 2020.2.

What are logical tables and physical tables?

Data sources in 2020.2 use a data model that has two layers: a logical layer where you can relate tables, and a physical layer where tables can be joined or unioned. Tables that you drag to the logical layer use relationships and are called logical tables. Every logical table can contain one more physical tables in the physical layer.

For more information, see The Tableau Data Model.

Can relationships exist between tables from different connections?

Yes. You can create a data source with relationships between tables from different connections. For more information, see Combine Data in Plan the Data Source.

Can I use inequality operators or calculated fields to define relationships?

In Tableau 2020.3 and later, you can create relationships based on calculated fields, and compare fields used for relationships using operators in the relationship definition.

Note that the following connectors do not support inequality operators:

  • Google BigQuery
  • MapR
  • Salesforce

Do all connection types support logical tables and relationships?

Most relational connection types are completely supported. Cubes, SAP HANA (with OLAP attribute), JSON, and Google Analytics are limited to a single logical table in 20.2. Stored procedures can only be used within a single logical table.

Published data sources can't be related to each other. You also can't edit published data sources.

Unsupported

  • Cube databases do not support the new logical layer. Connecting to a cube offers the same experience as pre-2020.2.
  • Stored Procedures: Don't support federation, relationships, or joins. They are represented in a single logical table, and don't allow opening the Join/Union canvas (physical layer).
  • Splunk: Doesn't support left joins (and therefore relating logical tables).
  • JSON: Doesn't support federation, custom SQL, joins, or relationships (only unions).
  • Datasources that do not support LOD calcs. For more information, see Data Source Constraints for Level of Detail Expressions.

Limited support

  • Salesforce and WDC Standard Connections: These are represented as joined tables within a logical table. Adding them is currently only supported for single logical table data sources. Standard connections cannot join to an existing table.
  • SAP HANA: Doesn't support relating logical tables when the connection has the OLAP attribute set.

What types of data models are supported?

See The Tableau Data Model and Supported data model schemas

Is there a classic view of the Data Source page that I can use?

The physical layer of the Data Source page canvas is basically the 'classic view' of the Data Source page in previous versions of Tableau.

The default view of Data Source canvas is the logical layer starting in 2020.2. You must double-click a logical table in the Data Source page canvas to go to the physical layer of the canvas.

How do I create a single-table data source?

Drag a single table into the canvas (logical layer) of the Data Source page. In the worksheet, use the fields from that table in the Data pane for analysis.

You can add more data inside the single, logical table by double-clicking the table. This opens the physical layer of the Data Source page canvas. If you need to use joins or unions, you can drag the tables you want to join or union into the physical layer canvas. The physical tables are merged into their single, logical table.

This example shows the Book table in the Relationships canvas (logical layer) of the data source. Double-clicking the Book logical table opens the Join/Union canvas (physical layer). The joins merge the Award and Info tables with the Book table.

Has row-level security changed?

Row-level security works the same. For information on row-level security, see Best Practices for Row Level Security(Link opens in a new window) in Tableau Server help.

How do I use custom SQL in the new data model?

Double-click the New Custom SQL option in the left pane of the Data Source page (as before). The custom SQL will be contained by a single logical table.

What happens to my older data sources when I open them in 2020.2 and later versions?

The data is migrated without changes and you can continue to use the workbook as you did before.

When you open a pre-2020.2 workbook or data source in a 2020.2 version of Tableau, your data source will appear as a single logical table in the canvas with the name 'Migrated Data'. You can rename the Migrated Data table.

Your original, denormalized data may have been originally built from one or more tables using joins and unions. When you open the data source in Tableau 2020.2, Tableau migrates the denormalized data model to a single logical table in the new data model to ensure that your data and workbooks are migrated without changes.

To see the physical tables that make up the single logical table, double-click that logical table to open it in the physical layer. You will see its underlying physical tables, including joins and unions.

Do I need to change my migrated data source to use relationships instead of joins?

If you have existing multi-table data sources defined using physical layer joins, they will still work as they did before. You don't have to change your data source. You can relate logical tables to your migrated table, but you can't downgrade logical tables.

You might consider changing you data source to use relationships instead of joins if you want to add more tables to your data model. This will require you to remove tables from the physical layer, and then add them to the logical layer.

How do I view or edit the data model on the web?

Your workbook must use an embedded data source for you to be able to edit relationships and performance options in the Data Source page.

You cannot edit the data model of a published data source on the web or in Tableau Desktop.

Can I use a data source on Tableau Server or Tableau Online (version 2020.2 or later) in a previous version of Tableau Desktop (version 2020.1 or earlier)?

If you attempt to open a published data source or published workbook from Tableau Server or Tableau Online version 2020.2 or later in a previous version of of Tableau Desktop, any logical tables that were related to the root table in the data source will be removed. Only the root table (the first table added to that data source model) will remain.

If you attempt to use a local data source in a previous version of Tableau:

  • Tableau displays a warning that the data source is from a newer version of Tableau that isn't compatible with the previous version.
  • On the Data Source page, only the root table will remain in the data source.
  • In the Data pane in a Tableau Desktop worksheet, Tableau displays errors (red exclamation points) next to affected fields that are not part of the root table.

If you attempt to use a published data source in a previous version of Tableau:

  • Tableau displays a warning that the data source is from a newer version of Tableau that isn't compatible with the previous version.
  • In the Data pane in a Tableau Desktop worksheet, Tableau displays an error (red exclamation point) next to the selected data source and a message that the connection needs to be updated. Click Show Details for more information about the error.
Tableau Desktop 2020

Can published data sources be related to each other?

No. Also, you can't edit or view the data model for a published data source.

If you want to combine data from published data sources, blends are currently your only option.

How do extracts work with related logical tables?

Extract data is now stored based on logical tables (replaces the Single Table option) or physical tables (replaces the Multiple Tables option). For more information, see Create an extract.

If I need to downgrade from 2020.2 to a previous version, what happens to relationships between logical tables?

If you downgrade a 2020.2 workbook to a previous version of Tableau, any logical tables that were related to the root table in the model will be removed from the data source. Only the root table (the first table added to that model) will remain.

All sheets in the workbook used fields from logical tables (non-root) become invalid, because their tables and fields have been removed from the data model.

Downgrading works best for workbooks that contain single-table data sources.

How does the new data model work with cubes?

Cubes work the same as in previous versions of Tableau. A cube data source will appear as a single-table data source, just like it is today. You can't create relationships using cube data.

Interaction with other Tableau features and products

Does Explain Data work with multi-table data sources that use relationships?

In 2020.3, you can use Explain Data with data sources that contain multiple, related tables. Cardinality and Referential Integrity settings for relationships must be set up correctly for Explain Data to analyze multi-table, related data.

In 2020.2, you can use Explain Data with a single-table data sources only. Your data source can have a single, logical table that is defined by one or more physical tables.

Does Ask Data work with multi-table data sources?

Ask Data fully supports multi-table, normalized data sources.

How do new data modeling capabilities affect using Tableau Bridge?

You will need to update to the latest version of Tableau Bridge for full compatibility with 2020.2 data modeling functionality.

When should I use Tableau Prep vs. authoring in Tableau Desktop, Tableau Online, or Tableau Server to create a data source?

Tableau Prep cleans data, and creates flows, extracts, and published data sources that contain physical tables.

In Tableau Desktop, and in Tableau Online and Tableau Server web authoring, you can create data sources that use normalized data models. These data models can be made of logical tables and physical tables, and your data sources can be saved as live data sources or as extracts.

Only logical tables can be related. Physical tables can be joined and unioned.

Analysis with multi-table data sources

Does analysis work differently with multi-table data sources that use relationships?

Using a data source that has multiple, related tables affects how analysis works in Tableau. Because multiple, related tables have independent domains and retain their native level of detail, when you drag fields into the view:

  • Data is queried at its natural level of detail.
  • Only data that is relevant to a viz is queried.
  • The relationships between the tables affect the results of the query. The flow of building a viz can vary depending on how tables of fields are related to each other in the data model, or if they aren't related directly.

For more information, see Don’t Be Scared of Relationships(Link opens in a new window), How Analysis Works for Multi-table Data Sources that Use Relationships, Unmatched values behavior for dimensions that might surprise you, and Troubleshooting multi-table analysis.

Do LODs work the same with the new data model? When should I use an LOD?

LOD expressions and calculations work the same. Since Tableau now understands the level of detail (LOD) of your input tables, you shouldn't need to use LOD calculations to remove unwanted duplication due to joins.

You may still want to use LOD calcs to:

  • Handle unwanted duplication in your source tables.
  • Compute multi-level aggregations (e.g. an average over a sum)
  • To do cohort analysis (e.g. to compute the first order date for each customer)

If the dimensionality of an LOD calculation includes fields from a single table, that LOD calculation will appear in its owning table in the Data pane.

How can I tell if I combined my data correctly with relationships?

You have several options for validating your data model for analysis. As you create the model for your data source, we recommend going to a sheet, selecting that data source, and then building a viz to explore record counts, expected data, unmatched values, nulls, or repeated measure values. Try working with fields across different tables to ensure everything looks how you expect it to.

What to look for:

  • Are your relationships in the data model using the correct matching fields for their tables?
  • Would adding multiple matching field pairs make the relationship more accurate?
  • What are the results of dragging different dimensions and measures into the view?
  • Are you seeing the expected number of rows?
  • If you changed any of the Performance Options settings from the default settings, are the values that you are seeing in the viz what you would expect? If they aren't, you might want to check the settings, or reset to the default.

Options for validating relationships and the data model:

  • Every table includes a count of its records, as a field named TableName(Count), at the level of detail for that table. To see the count for a table, drag its Count field into the view. To see the count for all tables, select the Count field for each table in the Data pane, and then click the Text Table in Show Me.
  • Click View Data in the Data pane to see the number of rows and data per table. Also, before you start creating relationships, viewing the data from the data source before or during analysis can be useful to give you a sense of the scope of each table. For more information, see View Underlying Data.
  • Drag dimensions onto rows to see the Number of Rows in the status bar. To see unmatched values, click the Analysis menu, and then select Table Layout > Show Empty Rows or Show Empty Columns. You can also drag different measures to the view, such as <YourTable>(Count) from one of the tables represented in your viz. This ensures that you will see all values of the dimensions from that table.

Can I see the queries that Tableau is generating for relationships?

If you would like to see the queries that are being generated for relationships, you can use the Performance Recorder in Tableau Desktop.

  1. Click the Help menu, and then select Settings and Performance > Start Performance Recording.
  2. Drag fields into the view to build your viz.
  3. Click the Help menu, and then select Settings and Performance > Stop Performance Recording. The Performance Recording workbook will automatically open.
  4. In the Performance Summary dashboard, under Events Sorted By Time, click an 'Executing Query' bar and view the query below.

Another more advanced option is to use the Tableau Log Viewer(Link opens in a new window) on GitHub. You can filter on a specific keyword using end-protocol.query. For more information, start with the Tableau Log Viewer wiki page(Link opens in a new window) in GitHub.

Changes to different parts of the interface

How has the Data Source page changed? The data grid? View Data? The Data pane?

The Data Source page (canvas, data grid), View Data, and Data pane have been updated to support a multi-table analysis experience.

Tableau Desktop 2020 ماهو

Your first view of the data source canvas is now the logical layer, which is where you define relationships. The data grid shows row data for each table’s level of detail.

In the Data pane, fields and calculated fields are automatically organized by their native level of detail.

The View Data window displays row level data at the correct level of detail, without replication, to make validation easier. Get row counts for each table in the Data pane using Table(Count) fields.

View Data column order changes in Tableau 2020.2 and later

When you open a data source from a previous version of Tableau in Tableau 2020.2 or later, the column order may be different. Columns may be displayed differently in the View Data window, and the column order may be different when you export it to CSV format.

This change in how column order is handled in the View Data window is required to support relationships and logical tables.

If you use scripts that depend on a customized column order, we recommend using the Tableau Extensions API for View Data to download underlying data to CSV format.

How does Count of Table work versus Number of Records?

You will no longer see the Number of Records field in data sources that contain logical tables. Every table includes a count of its records, as a field named TableName(Count), at the level of detail for that table. In the previous example you can see Addresses(Count), Customers(Count), and LineItems(Count).

COUNT of table = SUM of Number of Records per table. You can't build calculations on top of a table's Count field. Count is aggregate-only.

Note: You might see the Number of Records field in the Data pane if you open a pre-2020.2 workbook that used Number of Records in a view.

Where are sets, groups, and calculated fields shown?

If the field belongs to a table, it is listed under the table. If it doesn’t, it is listed in the general area at the bottom of the Data pane.

Calculated fields are listed with their originating field, if all of their input fields come from the same table.

Sets and groups are displayed under the table with their originating field.

Fields that don't belong to a specific table are displayed in the general area below the tables. These include: aggregated calculations, calculations that use fields from multiple tables, Measure Names, and Measure Values.

Thanks for your feedback!

Note: If you are looking for information about how to install Tableau Server, see the Install and Configure(Link opens in a new window) section in the Tableau Server Help instead.

This topic describes how to install and activate Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder from the user interface. For information about how to install and activate your product from the command line, see Install Tableau Desktop and Tableau Prep Builder from the Command Line(Link opens in a new window).

Before you begin

To install Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder you will need two things; a Creator product key (the key number starts with the letters TC) and the installer for the version you want to install.

Note: A product key is not required if your organization uses Login-based license management for product activation. For more information see Login-based License Management(Link opens in a new window) in the Tableau Server help.

For information about what applications are included with a Creator product key, see the Tableau Pricing(Link opens in a new window) page.

Where's the installer?

Important: Starting with version 10.5, Tableau Desktop, Tableau Reader, and Tableau Public (desktop) only run on a 64-bit operating system. Tableau Prep Builder is only available for a 64-bit operating system. If you want to install Tableau Desktop on a 32-bit operating system, open the Product Downloads and Release Notes(Link opens in a new window) page and download the installer for version 10.4 or earlier and follow the install instructions in the Tableau Desktop Deployment(Link opens in a new window) guide for that version.

For the most current version of Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder, go to the Customer Portal(Link opens in a new window) page. In the Product Downloads section, click the appropriate link to download the installer for your product and operating system.

You can also find the installers for all products and versions on the Product Downloads and Release Notes(Link opens in a new window) page.

  1. Open the Product Downloads and Release Notes(Link opens in a new window) page and select Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder from the list on the left side of the page.

  2. Click on the version you want to install.

  3. In the Download Files section of the page, click on the installer for your operating system to download it.

Where's my product key?

You need your product key to activate Tableau Desktop and Tableau Prep Builder after the install process is finished. If you have a creator license, the same key activates both Tableau Desktop and Tableau Prep Builder. You can always view your product key in the Customer Portal(Link opens in a new window). For more information about license types, see User-Based licenses(Link opens in a new window) in the Tableau Server help.

Note: If you have trouble signing in to the Customer Portal page, or if you need help retrieving your product key, contact Customer Service(Link opens in a new window) and provide your name, company, phone number, and email address.

As a first time user

  1. Sign in to the Customer Portal(Link opens in a new window) page on the Tableau website using your email address and password. The information you need to sign into the portal for the first time is sent to you in a welcome email from Tableau after you purchase(Link opens in a new window) the product.

  2. At the top of the Tableau Customer Portal page, click My Keys.

  3. A table opens, listing any product keys assigned to you. Copy your product key from the Key Name column in the table. Keep this key ready and secure.

    Note: This example does not show any actual keys. The highlighted area shows where your key would be listed.

As an existing user

  1. Open your existing version of Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder.

  2. From the top menu, click Help > Manage Product Keys.

  3. Copy your product key from the Product Key column in the table. Keep this key ready and secure.

    If you are not able to open the Manage Product Keys dialog to see your key, log into the Customer Portal(Link opens in a new window) and follow the instructions for first time users above.

If you don't have a product key, try the 14-day Free Trial(Link opens in a new window) or download the Tableau Desktop Public Edition(Link opens in a new window) instead. If you are a student or teacher, go to the Academic programs(Link opens in a new window) page to request a license and receive instructions about how to download your copy of Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder.

Install the product

Download the installer using the instructions in Where's the installer? For Mac, the installer is downloaded to your Downloads folder.

Note: The installer detects and displays the user interface based on the operating system display language setting.

If you're using a deployment tool that requires the Windows installer (.msi file) to install Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder, follow the instructions in Extract and run the Windows (MSI) installer to extract the .msi file from the Tableau installer .exe file.

Click the tab for the product you are installing to view the installation steps.

  1. As an Administrator, log in to the computer where you are installing Tableau Desktop.

  2. Depending on your operating system, do one of the following:

    • For Windows: Run the installer and follow the prompts.

    • For Mac: Open the Disk image file (.DMG) and double-click the installer package (.PKG) to start the installation.

    Drivers for some data sources are installed automatically when you install Tableau Desktop. See the Database drivers installed with Tableau Desktop and Tableau Prep Builder section in the Before You Install topic for specifics.

  3. To enable or disable usage reporting complete the following steps for your operating system.

    This option allows us to gather usage pattern data to improve the product. For more information about this option and how to turn it off after installation, see Turn off usage reporting. For more information about the type of data we collect, see Tableau Product Usage Data(Link opens in a new window).

    Windows

    • To opt out of providing usage data, select the Don't send product usage data check box.

    Mac

    • On the Installation Type step, in the bottom-left of the install wizard, click Customize. To opt out of sending product usage data, select the Don't send product usage data check box.

      On the Mac you can also change the settings on this page to customize your install.

      Note: Starting in Tableau Desktop version 2019.4, only the PostgreSQL driver is installed automatically on the Mac. If you need other database drivers, you can install them from the Driver Download(Link opens in a new window) page.

  4. (Optional) On Windows, to customize the install, on the Install welcome screen, click Customize and change any of the following options:

    • Install location: Specify a different location to install Tableau Desktop.

      Important: If you specify a custom directory for the install location and plan to install future releases to this same location, you need to specify a version specific sub-folder to install to. Otherwise you will need to uninstall the previous version first. Side-by-side installs of multiple versions in the same sub-directory is not supported.

    • Create a desktop shortcut: Clear the check box if you don't want to automatically create a desktop shortcut for Tableau.

    • Create a Start menu shortcut: Clear the check box if you don't want to automatically add a shortcut for Tableau to the Start menu.

    • Check for Tableau product updates: Clear the check box if you want to disable the product update feature. This feature checks for maintenance updates and installs them automatically. If you disable this option at install it also disables the menu option for users. For more information about the product update feature, see Control Product Updates for Tableau Desktop.

    • Install database drivers: Clear the check box if you don't want to automatically install the database drivers. You can also disable one or more of the drivers from the command line. For more information about this option, see Installer properties(Link opens in a new window).

  5. Click Install to begin installation. If you run into any difficulties, see Troubleshoot Your Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder Installation.

After installation is complete, you will need to activate and register the product to begin using it. For more information, see Activate and register your product.

Important: Tableau Prep Builder is designed to work with Tableau Desktop. It is recommended that you install Tableau Prep Builder on the same machine as Tableau Desktop.
Do not install Tableau Prep Builder on the same computer running Tableau Server. Tableau Server Resource Manager (SRM) can't distinguish between Tableau Server protocol server process and Tableau Prep Builder protocol server process. If the computer resources are exhausted, SRM may terminate the protocol server process belonging to Tableau Prep Builder, which has no recovery mechanism.

  1. As an Administrator, log in to the computer where you are installing Tableau Prep Builder.

  2. Depending on your operating system, do one of the following:

    • For Windows: Run the installer and follow the prompts.

    • For Mac: Open the Disk image file (.DMG), and then double-click the installer package (.PKG) to start the installation.

  3. When prompted, accept the licensing agreement to continue the installation.

  4. To enable or disable usage reporting complete the following steps for your operating system.

    This option allows us to gather usage pattern data to improve the product. For more information about this option and how to turn it off after installation, see Turn off usage reporting. For more information about the type of data we collect, see Tableau Product Usage Data(Link opens in a new window).

    Windows

    • To opt out of providing usage data, select the Don't send product usage data check box.

    Mac

    • On the Installation Type step, in the bottom-left of the install wizard, click Customize. To opt out of sending product usage data, select the Don't send product usage data check box.

  5. (Optional) To customize the install, on the Install welcome screen for Windows or on the Installation Type step for the Mac, click Customize and change any of the following options:

    Windows

    • Install location: Specify a different location to install Tableau Prep Builder.

    • Create a desktop shortcut: Clear the check box if you don't want to automatically create a desktop shortcut for Tableau Prep Builder.

    • Create a Start menu shortcut: Clear the check box if you don't want to automatically add a shortcut for Tableau Prep Builder to the Start menu

    • Enable error reporting : If Tableau Prep Builder has a problem and shuts down unexpectedly, crash dump files and logs are generated and placed in your My Tableau Prep Builder Repository > Logs and My Tableau Prep Builder Repository > Logs > crashdumps files.

      To turn off this option during install, clear this check box during install. To turn this option off after installation see Turn off error reporting(Link opens in a new window).

    • Install database drivers: Clear the check box if you don't want to automatically install the database drivers.

      Important:Tableau Prep Builder is only available in 64-bit and If you already have 32-bit drivers installed, you'll need to install the 64-bit version of those drivers to connect to your data with Tableau Prep Builder.

    Mac

    • Create a desktop shortcut: Select the check box to automatically create a desktop shortcut for Tableau Prep Builder.
    • Don't send product usage data Select the check box to opt out of sending product usage data.
    • Enable crash recovery (version 2020.3.3 and later): Clear the check box to turn off file recovery. In the event of a crash, flow files won't automatically be saved. For more information about managing this option post-install, see Turn off file recovery.
    • PostgreSQL database driver: Clear the check box if you don't want to automatically install the database driver.

      Note: Starting in version 2019.4.1, only the PostgreSQL driver is installed automatically on the Mac. If you need other database drivers, you can install them from the Driver Download(Link opens in a new window) page.

  6. Click Install to begin the product installation.

Activate and register your product

Important: The Tableau licensing service was moved to a new data center on October 6, 2018. This means that any environments that required special configuration (static IP safe listing for example) to access licensing.tableau.com or licensing.tableau.com will need to be updated. For more information, see Tableau Community(Link opens in a new window).

After the installation process is finished, the next step is to register and activate your product. Use one of the following options:

  • From the user interface: Follow the instructions in this topic. You'll need the product key that you saved earlier. If the computer where you're installing the product has internet access, the installation process walks you through activating the product.
  • From the command line: For instructions, see Activate Tableau Desktop and Tableau Prep Builder(Link opens in a new window) and Register Tableau Desktop and Tableau Prep Builder(Link opens in a new window).
  • Using Login-based license management: If you are using Tableau Server with a login-based license management enabled product key, you can activate Tableau Desktop and Tableau Prep Builder with one click. For more information, see Login-based License Management(Link opens in a new window).
  • Install offline: If you're installing the product on a computer that doesn't have internet access, or if your company firewall or proxy restricts access to the licensing.tableau.com site, follow the additional instructions in Activate your product offline to complete the activation process. To activate Tableau Prep Builder offline, you must use Tableau Desktop.

  1. After the installation process is finished, open Tableau Desktop. This launches the Tableau Registration form where you can register and activate your product.

  2. Fill out the fields on the registration form and then click Activate Tableau.

    If you are activating Tableau Desktop as a trial, click Start trial now at the bottom of the screen.

  3. Select one of the following options:

    • Activate with a product key: Use this option if you are activating using the user interface and have a product key.

    • Activate by signing into a server:Use this option if you are using login-based license management to activate your product.

  4. If you are activating with a product key, delete any existing text in the Enter product key field, copy your product key (from the location that you saved it to from the Where's my product key? procedure) and paste it into the text box, then click Activate.

    A second screen appears to complete the activation process. Click Continue to finish the process.

    If Tableau can't connect to the site that authenticates that product key, it can't complete the activation and you must activate the product offline. Follow the instructions in Activate your product offline to complete the activation process.

  5. If you are activating using login-based license management enter the URL for your server and click Connect.

    Sign into your server, then complete the registration page if needed, and click Register.

  1. Launch Tableau Prep Builder.

  2. In the Activation page, select one of the following options:

    • Start a trial: Select this option if you don't have a product key but want to try Tableau Prep Builder.
    • Activate with a product key: Use this option if you are activating using the user interface and have a product key.
    • Activate by signing in to a server: Use this option if you are using login-based license management to activate your product.
    • Purchase a license: Select this option to navigate to the Tableau website to purchase a license.
  3. If you are activating with a product key, delete any existing text in the Enter product key field, copy your product key (from the location that you saved it to from the Where's my product key? procedure) and paste it into the text box, then click Activate.

  4. Complete the registration form, and then click Register.

  5. If you are activating using login-based license management enter the URL for your server and click Connect.

    Sign into your server, then complete the registration page if needed, and click Register.

When your registration is complete, Tableau Prep Builder opens and you can start preparing your data.

New to Tableau Prep Builder? Try the Get Started tutorial(Link opens in a new window) to learn how to build your first flow.

Activate your product offline

Note: If you're upgrading versions and you've paid your maintenance (Tableau Desktop only) since the last time offline activation was completed, contact Tableau Customer Service(Link opens in a new window) via email to get an updated product key before continuing with offline activation.

If you're installing the product on a computer that doesn't have internet access, or if your company firewall or proxy restricts access to the licensing.tableau.com site, then you must complete the steps below to finish activating your product. You will need access to another computer that has internet access to complete all the steps in this procedure.

To activate Tableau Prep Builder offline, you will need your product key and Tableau Desktop version 2018.1 or later installed on the same computer that is offline.

  1. In the Activate Tableau dialog, click Activate.

  2. Tableau prompts you to save a file that you can use for offline activation. Click Save.

    Note: If you're performing the offline activation process because of firewall or proxy restrictions, you might not be prompted to save the activation file. In that case, manually disconnect the computer from the network and then restart this procedure so that you can be prompted to save the activation file.

  3. Save the file to a location that you can reach from a computer that does have internet access. Use the default file name (offline.tlq).

  4. Click Exit.

  5. From a computer that has internet access, open a web browser and go to the Activation(Link opens in a new window) page on the Tableau website.

  6. Complete the instructions for Offline Activation to submit your offline.tlq file and create a activation.tlf file.

  7. Save the activation.tlf file and then copy it to the computer where you installed Tableau Desktop.

  8. On the offline computer, double-click the activation.tlf file to perform the offline activation.

  1. Launch Tableau Desktop.

  2. From the top menu, select Help > Manage Product Keys.

  3. In the Manage Product Keys dialog, click Activate.

  4. Enter your Tableau Prep Builder product key and then click Activate.

  5. Tableau Desktop detects that you are offline and shows the following message. Click Save to create an activation file.

  6. Save the file to a location that you can access from the offline computer. Use the default file name (offline.tlq).

  7. From a computer that has internet access, open a web browser and go to the Activation(Link opens in a new window) page on the Tableau website.
  8. Follow the instructions and select the (offline.tlq) file that you just created and upload it to create a create a activation.tlf file. You will need this file to activate Tableau Prep Builder.

  9. Click Upload Activation File. You should receive a confirmation dialog that the upload was successful.

  10. In the confirmation dialog click the link to download the activation file to complete the activation process.

  11. Copy the activation.tlf file to the computer where you installed Tableau Prep Builder.

  12. On the offline computer, double-click the activation.tlf file to perform the offline activation.

  13. Close Tableau Desktop.

  14. Launch Tableau Prep Builder. You will be prompted to complete the registration process form to register the product. If you have previously registered a Tableau product, the fields may be populated automatically.

Change default settings

During installation, Tableau configures default settings for your display language and repository location. If you want to change those settings you can do this after install is complete.

Tableau also enables certain features for you by default such as usage reporting or automated product updates (Tableau Desktop only). For information about how to turn off these features and more, see Change Installation Settings after Installation(Link opens in a new window).

Set your display language (optional)

When you first run Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder, it recognizes your computer locale using the User Locale setting and uses the appropriate language if it is supported. If you are using an unsupported language, the application defaults to English.

You can configure Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder to display the user interface (menus, messages, etc.) in a different language by selecting Help > Choose Language from the top menu. Restart the application to apply the change.

For Tableau Prep Builder, the display format for numbers and dates is based on the locale of the operating system on the machine where the application is installed. For Tableau Desktop you can configure date and number formatting for your workbooks. For more information see Language and Locale(Link opens in a new window) in the Tableau User help.

Change your My Tableau Repository location (optional)

During install, Tableau Desktop and Tableau Prep Builder automatically creates a My Tableau <application> Repository folder structure in your documents folder on your computer. If you need to move this repository to another location, for example because you are required to have your data on a network server instead of on your local machine, you can specify a new location and point Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder to the new folder.

When setting a new location for your repository, the following rules apply:

  • The new folder must be a directory.

  • You must have permissions to write to the new folder.

  • The new folder can't be located in the existing My Tableau Repository folder structure.

Note: Changing the repository location does not move the files contained in the original repository. Instead, Tableau creates a new repository where you can store your files.

  1. Open Tableau Desktop or Tableau Prep Builder.

  2. From the top menu, select File >Repository Location.

  3. In the Select Repository Folder dialog, select a new folder that will act as the new repository location.

  4. Restart the application to use the new repository.

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